Zachman Framework V3.0 for Enterprise Architecture

(I copied this site one day when John's was down.)
From the original announcement of John's V3 Framework:  

V1.0 of the Zachman Framework for Enterprise Architecture evolved from 1987. Over this period various people incorporated inconsistent terminology. To correct this inconsistency, in October 2008 John Zachman released V2.0 of the framework. In August 2011 he released V3.0, as illustrated in Figure 1.9.
This clears up a number of misconceptions and misunderstandings that have occurred over the years with the original version of the Framework (Version 1.0). A full-size graphic is provided online in PDF and Landscape print mode [1].

The column headings are now more consistent with the interrogatives, which have been moved to the bottom. The top row of each column provides a broad example. For instance the What column is about Data and Inventory Sets (as a broad example at the top); the How column is about Function and Process Transformations at the top; the Where column is about Network and Distribution Networks at the top; the Who column is about People and Responsibility Assignments at the top; the When column is about Time and Timing Cycles at the top; and the Why column is about Motivation and Motivation Intentions at the top.

The Row naming has also now changed to more meaningful terms:

  • Row 1 is now the Executive Perspective on the left—for Business Context Planners and Identification across the columns; with the right axis showing this addresses Scope Contexts and Scope Identification Lists in an enterprise. In the book, we will refer to this row as Scope.
  • Row 2 is the Director Perspective on the left—for Business Concept Owners and Definition across the columns; with the right axis showing this addresses Business Concepts for Business Definition Models. We will refer to this row as Business.
  • Row 3 is now the Architect Perspective on the left—for Business Logic Designers and Representation across the columns; with the right axis showing this addresses System Logic for System Representation Models. We will refer to this row as System.
  • Row 4 is now the Engineer Perspective on the left—for Business Physics Builders and Specification across the columns; with the right axis showing this addresses Technology Physics for Technology Specification Models. We will refer to this row as Technology.
  • Row 5 is the Technician Perspective on the left—for Business Component Implementers and Configuration across the columns; with the right axis showing this addresses Tool Components for Tool Configuration Models. We will refer to this row as Components.
  • Row 6 is the Business Perspective on the left—for Users of the enterprise and Instantiations across the columns; with the right axis showing this addresses Operations Instances and Implementations. We will call this the Enterprise.

    The Zachman Framework V3.0 graphic is at http://www.ies.aust.com/EA_Book/ZachmanV3.pdf

Notice that there are horizontal lines across the columns to represent integration and alignment, with double headed arrows down each column between the cells to signify transformation. We discuss alignment in Chapter 4 and Chapter 8. The examples in each cell have changed to be more illustrative, with more relevant terms than in the V1.0 Framework. The result now is a more understandable graphic for Business and for IT users of the Framework.

In V1.0 we referred to each cell by column number and row number, such as Column 1, Row 2. In V3.0 we can explicitly identify each cell by the name of each column and the purpose of each row, such as Inventory Definition in Figure 1.9 (for Col 1, Row 2) or Process Representation (for Col 2, Row 3). In the book we will use both of these reference methods to refer to individual cells for both versions of the Zachman Framework.

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